Rules

ADV tournaments follow standard USAV rules. There are certain rules, however, that we either clarify or relax to make the games a little easier and less contentious for players to ref.

 

Standard Outdoor Rules:

 

  • Block as a touch: For any doubles format, a block counts as a touch. For all other formats, a block does not count as a touch.
  • A net is a net: If you contact any portion of the net during play, it is a fault.
  • Continuation: When the ball is down, the play is over. No faults are to be called after the play is dead.
  • Finger action over the net: Set overs are considered illegal even if the player is at 6 or 12 with the net or if the set inadvertently drifts over the net. Redirecting a block is a legal play as long as the player does not have extended contact with the ball. The block must be a single continuous motion without catching the ball.
  • Double contact on the first ball: Any first ball (including serve receive) can be doubled as long as it is a single continuous attempt to play the ball and there is no fingertip action. Hands do not have to be together. Fingertip action on a non-hard-driven ball must be a legal contact (e.g., a clean hand set).
  • Hard-driven ball: Finger action (beach dig) is allowed for the first contact on a hard-driven ball. Hard-driven is defined as a ball you don’t have time to think about.
  • Back-row attacks: For all reverse formats, a male player can attack the ball above the net if he jumps from behind the 3m line. If the male player is on or in front of the 3m line, a portion of the ball must be below the height of the net at contact, otherwise, it is a fault.
  • No courtesy rule: Any player can serve to any opposing player regardless of gender.
  • Court boundary: Entering any adjacent court that is scheduled for competition during play is a fault.
  • No centerline violations: If a player goes under the net during play, it is not a fault, unless it interferes with the other team's ability to play the ball.
  • Antennae: The standards (poles) are the antennae. If the ball touches or passes over the poles, it is out.
  • Time outs: A single one-minute time out per team per set is allowed.
  • Game-delay forfeiture: Any delay longer than 5 minutes creates a forfeiture of the current set, including those caused by injury. TD has the discretion to extend injury time-outs.

 

Standard Indoor Rules:

 

  • Block as a touch: Block does not count as a touch in indoor formats.
  • A net is a net: If you contact any portion of the net during play, it is a fault.
  • Continuation: When the ball is down, the play is over. No faults are to be called after the play is dead.
  • Finger action over the net: Set overs are considered illegal even if the player is at 6 or 12 with the net or if the set inadvertently drifts over the net.  Redirecting a block is a legal play as long as the player does not have extended contact with the ball. The block must be a single continuous motion without catching the ball.
  • Back-row attacks: For all reverse formats, a male player can attack the ball above the net if he jumps from behind the 3m line. If the male player is on or in front of the 3m line, a portion of the ball must be below the height of the net at contact, otherwise, it is a fault.
  • Guy/Girl contacts: There is no requirement for a specific number of touches for male or female players.
  • No courtesy rule: Any player can serve to any opposing player regardless of gender.
  • No Rotation: Teams are not required to rotation positions on the court, but they do need to maintain a consistent serving order.
  • Court boundary: Entering any adjacent court that is scheduled for competition during play is a fault.
  • Centerline violations: If a player goes under the net during play, it is a fault, regardless of whether the player interferes with the other team's ability to play the ball.
  • Time outs: A single one-minute time out per team per set is allowed.
  • Game-delay forfeiture: Any delay longer than 5 minutes creates a forfeiture of the current set, including those caused by injury. The Tournament Director has the discretion to extend injury time-outs.